API pumps form the basis of all pump configurations and are commonly modified with the addition of specialty components to maximize pump performance on a per-well basis.

RHA API Pump

Don-Nan RHA API insert pumps are heavy-walled, stationary barrel, top anchor pumps recognized by API as a standard design. These pumps are
suitable for moderate depths with high sand fallback on well shutdown. Fluid dispersion directly above the seat nipple prevents the pump from becoming stuck in such a situation.

The heavy-walled barrel is less sensitive to pressure than the similar Don-Nan RWA pump and therefore may be run slightly deeper than thin-walled RWA API insert pumps.

The seating options on this pump include mechanical or cup types suitable for high temperatures and mechanical types to simplify well maintenance. A mechanical hold-down does not require repair unless major damage has occurred, whereas cups should be replaced every time the pump is unset. Both hold-down types follow the same procedure of setting by placing the weight of the sucker rods down on the pump and unsetting by lifting them up.

RHB API Pump

Don-Nan RHB API insert pumps are heavy-walled, stationary barrel, bottom hold-down pumps recognized by API as a standard design. These
pumps are recommended for depths of 8,000 ft [2,438.4 m] or greater when there is little chance of sand accumulation. If sand is an issue
nonstandard accessories such as a top seal can be used to prevent a stuck pump.

These pumps can also be modified for use as a stroke-through pump to release sand and other material. To minimize damage to the plunger and
barrel, a grooved-body plunger is often used to catch and carry the sand away from those components.

Seating options on this pump include mechanical or cup types suitable for high temperatures and mechanical types for simplified well maintenance. A mechanical hold-down does not require repair unless major damage has occurred, whereas cups should be replaced every time the pump is unset. Both hold-down types follow the same procedure of setting and unsetting by placing the weight of the sucker rods down on the pump or lifting up.

RXB API Pump

The Don-Nan RXB API insert pump is a heavy-walled, stationary barrel, bottom hold-down pump recognized by API as a standard design. This
pump is most often used in moderate to deep wells where there is little chance of sand accumulation. If sand or gas is an issue, the pump
can be paired with optional accessories to address those challenges. The operating capacity of this pump falls between the Don-Nan RHB
and RWB API insert pumps: Like the Don-Nan RWB API insert pump, the barrel is threaded on the inside, reducing the number of connections needed and allowing room for a larger bore. The wall thickness, however, is similar to the Don-Nan RHB API insert pump, enabling operation at greater depths.

Seating options on this pump include mechanical or cup types suitable for high temperatures, and mechanical types for simplified well maintenance. A mechanical hold-down does not require repair unless major damage has occurred, whereas cups should be replaced every time the pump is unset. Both hold-down types follow the same procedure of setting and unsetting by placing the weight of the sucker rods down on the pump or lifting up.

RWA API Pump

Suitable for shallow to moderate depths, Don-Nan RWA API insert pumps are thin-walled, stationary barrel, top anchor pumps recognized by API as a standard design. Because the pump barrel is threaded on the inside, there are fewer connections required, thereby reducing service costs.

The top hold-down anchor requires that fluid be discharged from the pump just above the seating nipple, which prevents sand or other solid material from accumulating and causing the pump to become stuck. Seating options include mechanical or cup types suitable for high temperatures and mechanical types to simplify well maintenance. A mechanical hold-down does not require repair unless major damage has occurred, whereas cups should be replaced every time the pump is unset. Both hold-down types follow the same procedure of setting by placing the weight of the sucker rods down on the pump and unsetting by lifting them up.

Metallurgy and component coatings can be adapted to well conditions to maximize pump life.

RWB API Pump

Don-Nan RWB API insert pumps are thin-walled, stationary barrel, bottom holddown pumps recognized by API as a standard design. These pumps are most often used in shallow to moderate depths where there is little chance of sand accumulation. If sand is an issue, a top hold-down design may be more suitable. Alternatively, nonstandard accessories such as a top seal may be used to eliminate a stuck-pump scenario. The thin-walled barrel is threaded on the inside, which reduces the number of connections needed on the pump and enables a larger bore.

Seating options on this pump include mechanical or cup types suitable for high temperatures and mechanical types for simplified well maintenance. A mechanical hold-down does not require repair unless major damage has occurred, and cups should be replaced each time the pump is unset. Both hold-down types follow the same procedure of setting and unsetting by placing the weight of the sucker rods down on the pump or by lifting up.

RWT API Pump

Recommended for shallow operating depths, Don-Nan RWT API insert pumps are thin-walled, traveling barrel, bottom hold-down pumps recognized by API as a standard design. Unlike other insert pumps, the plunger assembly is attached to the hold-down where it becomes stationary, whereas the barrel assembly is the traveling portion that moves with the sucker rod string.

Because the barrel assembly moves, sand and scale can accumulate around the hold-down without sticking the pump; upon restarting operation, all settled material will be dispersed in the fluid. The exit point for fluid is through an open three-wing cage, which prevents any
solid material from reentering the pump on well shutdown and lengthens the run life of internal components.

The seating options on this pump include mechanical or cup types suitable for high temperatures, and mechanical types for simplified well
maintenance. A mechanical hold-down does not require repair unless major damage has occurred, whereas cups should be replaced every time
the pump is unset. Both hold-down types follow the same procedure of setting and unsetting by placing the weight of the sucker rods down on
the pump or lifting up.